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Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Serum

Number of parameters covered 3

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Synonyms/Also Known as

BUN, Urea Nitrogen

Related tests

Creatinine, Creatinine Clearance, eGFR, Urinalysis, Renal Panel, Cystatin C, Urine Albumin and Albumin/Creatinine Ratio, Beta-2 Microglobulin, Urine Protein

Why get tested?

To evaluate kidney status, to diagnose and monitor the effectiveness of treatment of kidney disease or renal damage.

When to get tested?

Used as part of a renal function test, when a person has signs and symptoms related to kidney diseases, to monitor treatment for renal disease or damage.

Sample required

Blood

Test preparation needed

No special preparation required

About The Test

How is it used
The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test is used along with serum creatinine test to evaluate the renal status, to diagnose renal disease, and to monitor the treatment. Urea is a waste product of protein metabolism, produced in the liver. Urea is released in to the blood and carried to the kidneys, where it is filtered and released into the urine. Since this is a continuous process, there is usually a minute amount of urea in the blood. However, the levels of blood urea increase when there is renal disease or damage. When the creatinine and BUN tests results are abnormal or if a person has diseases such as diabetes or hypertension, these tests may be used to monitor the renal status and effectiveness of treatment. Blood creatinine and BUN tests may also be done to know the status of renal prior to procedures, such as a CT scan which may require the use of nephrotoxic drugs and dyes. Normally the levels of BUN may vary, but usually high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels are a sign of improper functioning of kidneys. High BUN levels can also be due to dehydration, burns, high protein diet and use of certain medications, etc.

FAQ’s

1. What are the other additional tests required?

In addition to BUN and Creatinine, renal function tests (RFT), serum electrolytes and imaging techniques like USG abdomen and CT scan may be done to assess the renal status.

2. How does BUN levels vary with age?

BUN levels increase with age. BUN levels are low in young babies and healthy young adults. BUN levels are slightly high in old people (age>60 years).

3. What is BUN/Creatinine ratio?

Ratio of BUN to creatinine is usually between 10:1 and 20:1. This ratio increases in congestive heart failure, dehydration, GI bleeding and increased dietary protein. This ratio decreases in liver diseases and malnutrition.

4. What does the results of BUN mean?

Normally the levels of BUN may vary, but usually high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels are a sign of improper functioning of kidneys. High BUN levels can also be due to dehydration, burns, high protein diet and use of certain medications, etc.